The groups representing Canadian artists say they feel the “urgency” of putting together a new, common approach to ending sexual harassment in the film industry, but also want to make sure they do it right.

Canadian film industry representatives gathered to discuss sexual harassment, discrimination, bullying, and violence at a five-hour meeting behind closed doors in Toronto.

Representatives from 16 organizations, including the ACTRA Canadian Actors Union, the Canadian Academy of Film and Television and the Directors Guild of Canada, met with a moderator and some lawyers on Thursday to discuss sexual harassment , discrimination, intimidation and violence during a five-hour meeting held behind closed doors in Toronto.

According to a statement, they came out of this meeting with a consensus that there should be a policy of “zero tolerance” for such behaviors and that to improve gender equality and diversity within the community. industry was part of the solution.

They also made four commitments, including the adoption of an industry-wide code of conduct that will clearly define the criteria for what is considered appropriate and inappropriate behavior, the application of the rules, and the consequences of their actions. transgression.

In a telephone interview on Friday, David Sparrow, ACTRA’s national president, did not want to set a timetable for the implementation of the measures.

Posted on 25 November 2017 at 14h58 Last updated on November 25, 2017 at 2:58 pm

Sexual Harassment: Canada’s Film Industry Wants to Adopt a Code of Conduct

Canadian representatives of the film industry are ... (Photo archives La Presse)

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Canadian film industry representatives gathered to discuss sexual harassment, discrimination, bullying and violence at a five-hour meeting behind closed doors in Toronto.

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VICTORIA AHEARN
The Canadian Press
TORONTO

The groups representing Canadian artists say they feel the “urgency” of putting together a new, common approach to ending sexual harassment in the film industry, but also want to make sure they do it right.

David Sparrow, President of the Canadian Players Union ... (Photo The Canadian Press) - image 1.0

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David Sparrow, President of the ACTRA Canadian Players Union.

PHOTO THE CANADIAN PRESS

Representatives from 16 organizations, including the ACTRA Canadian Actors Union, the Canadian Academy of Film and Television and the Directors Guild of Canada, met with a moderator and some lawyers on Thursday to discuss sexual harassment , discrimination, intimidation and violence during a five-hour meeting held behind closed doors in Toronto.

According to a statement, they came out of this meeting with a consensus that there should be a policy of “zero tolerance” for such behaviors and that to improve gender equality and diversity within the community. industry was part of the solution.

They also made four commitments, including the adoption of an industry-wide code of conduct that will clearly define the criteria for what is considered appropriate and inappropriate behavior, the application of the rules, and the consequences of their actions. transgression.

In a telephone interview on Friday, David Sparrow, ACTRA’s national president, did not want to set a timetable for the implementation of the measures.

“We will act quickly because we want to have things in place as quickly as possible. But all groups believe that doing things well is more important than doing them quickly, “he said.

Kendrie Upton, executive director of the Guild’s British-Colombian branch, echoed the same.

“I think that hesitation could make us miss precious time,” she said. But at the same time, it’s also important to do it right and we need a process to come up with just, thoughtful and effective measures. ”

Upton said the meeting made her very optimistic about the culture change the groups want to do.

“Seeing all these great organizations sitting at the same table and ready to work together to create a new normal that will ensure that all people have a safe and respectful workplace on the Canadian plateaux, it was very inspiring,” he said. she indicated.

David Sparrow will lead the task force to draft the new code of conduct.

“As for the code of conduct, I am not a lawyer so I do not know how legally it will be legally binding,” he admitted.

Stressing unanimity on the need to adopt such a measure, Mr. Sparrow said he was hopeful that organizations with a member breaking the rules would not sit idly by.

“I will expect, if I rely on the conversations we had yesterday, that people react positively at that time and intervene with the member at fault,” he concluded.